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 GALERIE ART PREMIER AFRICAIN GALERIE ART PRIMITIF AFRICAIN AFRICAN ART GALLERY

GALERIE ART PREMIER AFRICAIN GALERIE ART PRIMITIF AFRICAIN AFRICAN ART GALLERY

Art Gallery the Eye and the Hand
Situation : Welcome » Result of the research
Result of the research Result of the research : 'agenda'

Évolution conceptuelle en histoire de l'art africain
1. Le paradigme évolutionniste, concept scientifique pour interpréter les arts africains :
 
L'acquisition d'objets culturels africains lors de la colonisation favorise le développement de recherches scientifiques, tant sur le plan ethnologique que sur le plan de l'histoire de l'art. Pour Valentin Mudimbé, il y a en parallèle une quête promotionnelle de ces objets, considérés alors comme oeuvres d'art (dénommé : "art nègre", "art primitif"). Ces deux approches utilisent le concept de "primitif" pour interpréter les objets observés et présentés.
 
L'analyse esthétique de ces objets est fortement influencée au début par les paradigmes et les concepts évolutionnistes issus de l'anthropologie  - "phase d'ethnologisation" des cultures africaines, qui consiste à isoler les particularités culturelles, les objets et les sociétés. 
 
À la fin du XIXe siècle, Edward B. Tylor établit dans son ouvrage Primitive culture : researches int the development of mythology, religion, language, art and custom (1871) une relation entre les arts et les mentalités afin d'illustrer le caractère "primitife" et "inférieur" des populations étudiées. Les arts sont définis suivant leur développement technique. Ainsi, "il s'agit d'art de ces individus restés jusqu'à une époque récente à un niveau technique peu avancé, qui utilisent des outils mais pas des machines" (Sally Price 1995, 11). Et, au début du XXe
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Full text, digitalised by Lies Strijker and presented by the .Centre Aequatoria
Notes on the digitalisation and presentation


[Cover]

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[2]
IMPRIMI POTEST
Kanzenze, 12-2-1952
P. Simeon, o.m.f.
Sup. Reg.

IMPRIMATUR
Luabo-Kamina, 30-5-1952
+VICTOR PETRUS KEUPPENS
Vic. Ap. de Lulua


[3]

BANTU PHILOSOPHY
by
The Revd. Father PLACIDE TEMPELS

(Translated into English from "La Philosophie Bantoue" the French Version by Dr. A. Rubbens of Fr. Tempels' original work. The Revd. Colin King, M.A. Translator.)

With a Foreword to the English Edition by Dr Margaret Read, C.B.E.Ph. D.,M.A., formerly Professor of Education and Head of the Department Of Education in Tropical Areas, The

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Agenda des expositions d'Art primitif

  

 

février 2011 Exposition d' art primitif à la galerie : Senoufo
mars 2011 Exposition d' art primitif à la galerie : Senoufo
avril 2011 Exposition d' art primitif à la galerie : Dogon
mai  2011 Exposition d' art primitif à la galerie : Dogon
juin  2011 Exposition d' art primitif à la galerie : Dogon
juillet  2011 Exposition d' art primitif à la galerie : Dogon
août 2011 Exposition d' art primitif à la galerie : Dogon
septembre  2011 Exposition d' art primitif à la galerie : Yoruba
octobre 2011 Exposition d' art primitif à la galerie : Yoruba
novembre 2011 Exposition d' art primitif à la galerie : Yoruba
décembre 2011 Exposition d'
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Image Tristan Tzara
Tristan Tzara

Born     April 4 or April 16, 1896
Moineşti, Kingdom of Romania
Died     December 25, 1963 (aged 67)
Paris, France
Pen name     S. Samyro, Tristan, Tristan Ruia, Tristan Ţara, Tr. Tzara
Occupation     poet, essayist, journalist, playwright, performance artist, composer, film director, politician, diplomat
Nationality     Romanian, French
Writing period     1912–1963

            Guillaume Apollinaire, Henri Barzun, Fernand Divoire, Alfred Jarry, Jules Laforgue, Comte de Lautréamont, Maurice Maeterlinck, Adrian Maniu, Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, Ion Minulescu, Christian Morgenstern, Francis Picabia, Arthur Rimbaud, Urmuz, François Villon, Walt Whitman

Influenced

            Louis Aragon, Marcel Avramescu, Samuel Beckett, André Breton, William S. Burroughs, Andrei Codrescu, Jacques G.
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African traditional masks

There are an enormous variety of masks used in Africa. In West Africa, masks are used in masquerades that form part of religious ceremonies enacted to contact with spirits and ancestors.

The Yoruba, Igbo and Edo cultures, including Egungun Masquerades and Northern Edo Masquerades. The masks are usually carved with an extraordinary skill and variety by artists who will usually have received their training as an apprentice to a master carver - frequently it is a tradition that has been passed down within a family through many generations. Such an artist holds a respected position in tribal society because of the work that he/she creates, embodying not only complex craft techniques but also spiritual/social and symbolic knowledge. African masks are also used in the Mas or Masquerade of the Caribbean Carnival.

African masks are made from different materials: wood, bronze, brass, copper, ivory, terra cotta and glazed pottery, raffia and textiles. Some African masks are colourful. Many African masks represent animals. Some African tribes believe that the animal masks can help them communicate with the spirits who live in forests or open savannas. People of Burkina Faso known as the Bwa and Nuna call to the spirit to stop destruction. The Dogon of Mali have complex religions that also have animal masks. Their beliefs are in three main cults - the Awa, cult of the dead, Bini, cult of communication with spirits and Lebe, cult of earth and nature. These three main cults nevertheless use seventy-eight different types of masks. Most of the ceremonies of the Dogon culture are secret, although the antelope dance is shown to non-Dogons. The antelope masks are rough rectangular boxes with several horns coming out of the top. The Dogons are expert agriculturists and the antelope symbolizes a hard working farmer.

Another culture that has a very rich agricultural tradition is the
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Tristan Tzara (born Samuel or Samy Rosenstock, also known as S. Samyro; April 4 or April 16, 1896 – December 25, 1963) was a Romanian and Frenchavant-garde poet, essayist and performance artist. Also active as a journalist, playwright, literary and art critic, composer and film director, he was known best for being one of the founders and central figures of the anti-establishmentDada movement. Under the influence of Adrian Maniu, the adolescent Tzara became interested in Symbolism and co-founded the magazine Simbolulwith Ion Vinea (with whom he also wrote experimental poetry) and painter Marcel Janco. During World War I, after briefly collaborating on Vinea's Chemarea, he joined Janco in Switzerland. There, Tzara's shows at the Cabaret Voltaire and Zunfthaus zur Waag, as well as his poetry and art manifestos, became a main feature of early Dadaism. His work represented Dada's nihilisticside, in contrast with the more moderate approach favored by Hugo Ball.

After moving to Paris in 1919, Tzara, by then one of the "presidents of Dada", joined the staff of Littérature magazine, which marked the first step in the movement's evolution toward Surrealism. He was involved in the major polemics which led to Dada's split, defending his principles against André Breton and Francis Picabia, and, in Romania, against the eclecticmodernism of Vinea and Janco. This personal vision on art defined his Dadaist plays The Gas Heart (1921) and Handkerchief of Clouds (1924). A forerunner of automatist techniques, Tzara eventually rallied with Breton's Surrealism, and, under its influence, wrote his celebrated utopianpoem The Approximate Man.

During the final part of his career, Tzara combined his humanist and anti-fascistperspective with a

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