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GALERIE ART PREMIER AFRICAIN GALERIE ART PRIMITIF AFRICAIN AFRICAN ART GALLERY

Art Gallery the Eye and the Hand
Result of the research Result of the research : 'surface'

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Texte de présentation extrait de l'ouvrage:
J. Kerchache, J-L. Paudrat, L. Stephan, L'Art Africain Jacques Kerchache, Citadelles, 1988

Sans méthode préalable, la passion de l'Afrique m'a propulsé au cœur du Gabon, m'a porté du Congo en Guinée équatoriale, de la Côte-d'Ivoire au Libéria, m'a conduit du Burkina Faso au Mali, de l'Éthiopie au Bénin, du Nigeria au Cameroun et de la Tanzanie au Zaïre. De ces expériences parfois difficiles, physiques certes, mais surtout intellectuelles et spirituelles, de ma participation à certaines cérémonies et à diverses manipulations d'objets, de mon immersion temporaire mais effective dans les cultes de l'ancienne Côte des Esclaves, je ne puis restituer aujourd'hui que des sensations, des impressions et je me garderai de toute affirmation.

Cependant, devant la sculpture africaine, il faut cesser d'avoir peur d'être profane et se laisser envahir par elle ; il faut s'en approcher, la fréquenter, se l'approprier, l'aimer. Lui offrir son temps, lui ouvrir sa sexualité, ses rêves, lui livrer sa mort, ses inhibitions, redécouvrir autre chose en soi. Sans lâcheté, ne pas hésiter à désacraliser, sans les rejeter, ses sources culturelles. Ne plus avoir cette taie sur l'œil et se laisser aller à la jouissance, se laisser gagner par la magie.

Même si nous ne pouvons contempler cette sculpture que par fragments, ceux-ci
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Culture

Culture (from the Latin cultura stemming from colere, meaning "to cultivate")[1] is a term that has different meanings. For example, in 1952, Alfred Kroeber and Clyde Kluckhohn compiled a list of 164 definitions of "culture" in Culture: A Critical Review of Concepts and Definitions. However, the word "culture" is most commonly used in three basic senses:

    * excellence of taste in the fine arts and humanities, also known as high culture
    * an integrated pattern of human knowledge, belief, and behavior that depends upon the capacity for symbolic thought and social learning
    * the set of shared attitudes, values, goals, and practices that characterizes an institution, organization or group.

When the concept first emerged in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Europe, it connoted a process of cultivation or improvement, as in agriculture or horticulture. In the nineteenth century, it came to refer first to the betterment or refinement of the individual, especially through education, and then to the fulfillment of national aspirations or ideals. In the mid-nineteenth century, some scientists used the term "culture" to refer to a universal human capacity.

In the twentieth century, "culture" emerged as a concept central to anthropology, encompassing all human phenomena that are not purely results of human genetics.
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African art

African art constitutes one of the most diverse legacies on earth. Though many casual observers tend to generalize "traditional" African art, the continent is full of peoples, societies, and civilizations, each with a unique visual special culture. The definition also includes the art of the African Diasporas, such as the art of African Americans. Despite this diversity, there are some unifying artistic themes when considering the totality of the visual culture from the continent of Africa.

    * Emphasis on the human figure: The human figure has always been a the primary subject matter for most African art, and this emphasis even influenced certain European traditions. For example in the fifteenth century Portugal traded with the Sapi culture near the Ivory Coast in West Africa, who created elaborate ivory saltcellars that were hybrids of African and European designs, most notably in the addition of the human figure (the human figure typically did not appear in Portuguese saltcellars). The human figure may symbolize the living or the dead, may reference chiefs, dancers, or various trades such as drummers or hunters, or even may be an anthropomorphic representation of a god or have other votive function. Another common theme is the inter-morphosis of human and animal.

Yoruba bronze head sculpture, Ife, Nigeria c. 12th century A.D.

    * Visual abstraction: African artworks tend to favor visual abstraction over naturalistic representation. This is because many African artworks generalize stylistic norms. Ancient Egyptian art, also usually thought of as naturalistically depictive, makes use of highly abstracted and regimented visual canons, especially in painting, as well as the use of different colors to represent the qualities and characteristics of an individual being depicted.

    * Emphasis on sculpture: African artists
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Masks

The viewing of masks is often restricted to certain peoples or places, even when used in performance, or masquerade. African masks manifest spirits of ancestors or nature as well as characters that are spiritual and social forces. During a masquerade, which is performed during ceremonial occasions such as agricultural, initiation, leadership and funerary rites, the mask becomes the otherworld being. When collected by Western cultures, masks are often displayed without their costume ensemble and lack the words, music and movement, or dance, that are integral to the context of African masquerades. Visually, masks are often a combination of human and animal traits. They can be made of wood, natural or man-made fibers, cloth and animal skin. Masks are usually worn with costumes and can, to some extent, be categorized by form, which includes face masks, crest masks, cap masks, helmet masks, shoulder masks, and fiber and body masks. Maskettes, which are shaped like masks, are smaller and are not worn on or over the face. They may be worn on an individual’s arm or hip or hung on a fence or other structure near the performance area.

Sculpture

The cultures of Africa have created a world-renowned tradition of three-dimensional and relief sculpture. Everyday and ceremonial works of great delicacy and surface detail are fashioned by artists using carving, modeling, smithing and casting techniques. Masks, figures, musical instruments, containers, furniture, tools and equipment are all part of the sculptor’s repertoire. The human figure is perhaps the most prominent sculptural form in Africa, as it has been for millennia. Male and female images in wood, ivory, bone, stone, earth, fired clay, iron and copper alloy embody cultural values, depict the ideal and represent spirits, ancestors and deities. Used in a broad range of contexts--initiation, healing, divination,
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Treasures marks the National Museum of African Art's 25th anniversary as a Smithsonian museum. The first in a new exhibition series, Treasuresis an old-fashioned show about African art, reminiscent of the exhibitions that represented avant-garde opinions of the early 20th century. In 1926, Paul Guillaume, Parisian connoisseur and collector, cautioned readers to defer learning about the history and meaning of African art until they had studied African art purely as an art form, because to do otherwise "tends to obscure one's vision of the objects as sculpture."

I chose the familiar--traditional sculpture--to reveal aesthetic variances, to see African art as form, not function. Treasures, therefore, is about visual exploration and aesthetic discovery. Our understanding of African art is prescribed by what we see, and often, what we see is based on works displayed in museums. So, "Treasures" is just that--a sampling that gives us a peek into the realm of African art.

Westerners and Africans alike revere well-made form. Each admires skillful technique and execution, exquisitely rendered forms, pattern, balance, symmetry, surface treatments and a sense of completeness. African artists, however, strive to portray more than that. As metaphor or symbol, their artworks embody the world of ideas and beliefs--confirming their notions about themselves, life and death, the universe and the spiritual realm. Yet, despite our cultural presumptions that separate art from life, often separating aesthetics from meaning, and our ignorance of or indifference to what it means and how it is used, African art astonishes.

An eclectic display of sculptures from East, West, Central, and southern Africa created between the 15th

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Wassily Kandinsky

Birth name     Wassily Wassilyevich Kandinsky
Born     4 December 1866
Moscow
Died     13 December 1944 (aged 77)
Neuilly-sur-Seine
Nationality     Russian

Wassily Wassilyevich Kandinsky (Russian: Васи́лий Васи́льевич Канди́нский, Vasilij Vasil'evič Kandinskij; 4 December [O.S. 4 December] 1866 – 13 December 1944) was a Russian painter, and art theorist. He is regarded as the founder of abstract art and is, moreover, the chief theoretician of this type of painting.Template:Fact quoted from "Kandinsky" by Burkhard Riemschneider  1994 Benedikt Taschen Verlag GmbH

Born in Moscow, Kandinsky spent his childhood in Odessa. He enrolled at the University of Moscow and chose to study law and economics. Quite successful in his profession—he was offered a professorship (chair of Roman Law) at the University of Dorpat—he started painting studies (life-drawing, sketching and anatomy) at the age of 30.

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Vassily Kandinsky (Vassili Vassilievitch Kandinski, en russe : Василий Васильевич Кандинский) est un peintre russe et un théoricien de l’art né à Moscou le 4 décembre 1866 et mort à Neuilly-sur-Seine le 13 décembre 1944.

Considéré comme l’un des artistes les plus importants du XXe siècle aux côtés notamment de Picasso et de Matisse, il est le fondateur de l'art abstrait : il est généralement considéré comme étant l’auteur de la première œuvre non figurative de l’histoire de l’art moderne, une aquarelle de 1910 qui sera dite "abstraite". Certains historiens ou critiques d'art ont soupçonné Kandinsky d'avoir antidaté cette aquarelle pour s'assurer la paternité de l'abstraction sous prétexte qu'elle ressemble à une esquisse de sa Composition VII de 1913[réf. souhaitée].

Kandinsky est né à Moscou mais il passe son enfance à Odessa. Il s'inscrit à l’Université de Moscou et choisit le droit et l’économie. Il décide de commencer des études de peinture (dessin d’après modèle, croquis et anatomie) à l’âge de 30 ans.

En 1896 il s’installe à Munich où il étudie à l’Académie des Beaux-Arts. Il retourne à Moscou en 1918 après la révolution russe. En conflit avec les théories officielles de l’art, il retourne en Allemagne en 1921. Il y enseigne au Bauhaus à partir de 1922

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Carbon-14

Carbon-14, 14C, or radiocarbon, is a radioactive isotope of carbon discovered on February 27, 1940, by Martin Kamen and Sam Ruben at the University of California Radiation Laboratory in Berkeley, though its existence had been suggested already in 1934 by Franz Kurie. Its nucleus contains 6 protons and 8 neutrons. Its presence in organic materials is the basis of the radiocarbon dating method to date archaeological, geological, and hydrogeological samples.

There are three naturally occurring isotopes of carbon on Earth: 99% of the carbon is carbon-12, 1% is carbon-13, and carbon-14 occurs in trace amounts, e.g. making up as much as 1 part per trillion (0.0000000001%) of the carbon in the atmosphere. The half-life of carbon-14 is 5,730±40 years. It decays into nitrogen-14 through beta decay. The activity of the modern radiocarbon standard is about 14 disintegrations per minute (dpm) per gram carbon.

The atomic mass of carbon-14 is about 14.003241 amu. The different isotopes of carbon do not differ appreciably in their chemical properties. This is used in chemical research in a technique called carbon labeling: some carbon-12 atoms of a given compound are replaced with carbon-14 atoms (or some carbon-13 atoms) in order to trace them along chemical reactions involving the given compound.

Origin and radioactive decay

Carbon-14 is produced in the upper layers of the troposphere and the stratosphere by
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Datation

Littéralement, la datation est l'attribution d'une date. Ce terme peut donc s’appliquer à un évènement passé, un objet, un document, un fossile, une couche géologique ou encore un niveau archéologique.
Il désigne globalement la démarche, scientifique ou non, qui consiste à déterminer l’intervalle de temps séparant l’élément daté du temps présent.

On parle de « datation absolue » lorsque la datation mise en œuvre aboutit à un résultat chiffré exprimé en unité de temps (années, secondes, etc.). Par opposition, l’expression « datation relative » désigne la démarche qui consiste à déterminer l'ordre chronologique d'évènements ou d'objets du passé, sans connaître leurs âges réels. Une confusion est parfois faite entre les deux, lorsque dans le cadre d'une datation relative, la chronologie s'étend jusqu'au présent — ainsi, les « âges » des périodes définies par datation relative en stratigraphie sont souvent pris pour argent comptant, bien qu'ils n'aient de sens que comme des intervalles de temps circonscrits définis par rapport à tous les autres.

Datation par les sources écrites

Elle concerne la période historique. Avant le milieu du XXe siècle, les sources écrites (textes, inscriptions, etc.) constituaient les principaux éléments de datation à la disposition des historiens pour effectuer la datation des évènements historiques, avec les risques d’imprécisions et d’erreur que cela comporte.

Datation relative

Avant le
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Africa

Africa is the world's second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. At about 30.2 million km² (11.7 million sq mi) including adjacent islands, it covers 6% of the Earth's total surface area and 20.4% of the total land area. With a billion people (as of 2009, see table) in 61 territories, it accounts for about 14.8% of the World's human population. The continent is surrounded by the Mediterranean Sea to the north, the Suez Canal and the Red Sea to the northeast, the Indian Ocean to the southeast, and the Atlantic Ocean to the west. Not counting the disputed territory of Western Sahara, there are 53 countries, including Madagascar and various island groups, associated with the continent.

Africa, particularly central eastern Africa, is widely regarded within the scientific community to be the origin of humans and the Hominidae tree (great apes), as evidenced by the discovery of the earliest hominids and their ancestors, as well as later ones that have been dated to around seven million years ago – including Sahelanthropus tchadensis, Australopithecus africanus, A. afarensis, Homo erectus, H. habilis and H. ergaster – with the earliest Homo sapiens (human) found in Ethiopia being dated to ca. 200,000 years ago.

Africa straddles the equator and encompasses numerous climate areas; it is the only continent to stretch from the northern temperate to southern temperate zones.

Etymology

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Georges Braque

Georges Braque (13 May 1882 – 31 August 1963) was a major 20th century French painter and sculptor who, along with Pablo Picasso, developed the art movement known as cubism.

Youth

Georges Braque was born in Argenteuil, Val-d'Oise. He grew up in Le Havre and trained to be a house painter and decorator, as his father and grandfather were, but he also studied painting in the evenings at the École des Beaux-Arts in Le Havre from about 1897 to 1899. He apprenticed in Paris under a decorator and was awarded his certificate in 1902. The following year, he attended the Académie Humbert, also in Paris, and painted there until 1904. It was here that he met Marie Laurencin and Francis Picabia.

Fauvism

His earliest works were impressionistic, but, after seeing the work exhibited by the Fauves in 1905, Braque adopted a Fauvist style. The Fauves, a group that included Henri Matisse and André Derain among others, used brilliant colors and loose structures of forms to capture the most intense emotional response. Braque worked most closely with the artists Raoul Dufy and Othon Friesz, who shared Braque's hometown of Le Havre, to develop a somewhat more subdued Fauvist style. In 1906, Braque traveled with Friesz to L'Estaque, to Antwerp, and home to Le Havre to paint.

In May 1907, he
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FORCE ET MESURE

Elaborer une esthétique de l'Afrique noire apparaît comme une entreprise hasardeuse à bien des égards. Est-il légitime d'isoler ces objets, qu'aujourd'hui nous qualifions d'œuvres d'art, du cadre général de leurs relations et de leurs contraintes culturelles ? Peut-on les soumettre à un critère qui n'a jamais existé dans la pensée de leurs créateurs ? Et peut-on, enfin, voir dans cet art - si l'on s' en tient à ce terme - un phénomène uniforme, malgré la grande variété de styles tant régionaux que locaux que nous offre cet énorme continent, à la suite de longues évolutions historiques souvent mal connues ? Enfin, n'oublions pas que cette approche exclut de vastes régions, notamment l' Afrique blanche, c' est à dire la zone méditerranéenne avec son histoire millénaire ; l'Afrique orientale et méridionale dont les peuples de pasteurs ont donné naissance à des cultures pratiquement sans images ; et enfin ces sociétés de chasseurs, qui, encore à notre époque, n'ont pas dépassé le stade d'évolution de la préhistoire et dont les peintures rupestres constituent le principal témoignage d'une production artistique qui apparaît en divers points du continent. De même, il nous faut exclure de notre contribution à une esthétique de l'art d'Afrique noire les anciennes sociétés féodales, notamment le Bénin. Notre réflexion se borne donc aux vastes régions paysannes, véritable berceau de la sculpture sur bois.

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Jacques Kerchache


Vie des objets de surface

Les objets rituels, masques, statues, mobilier, utilisés en surf ace, jouent dans la société africaine traditionnelle, m rôle bien plus important que les objets funéraires, destinés à'être enterrés. Il faut leur adjoindre une petite quantité de pièces au double emploi (parures, mobilier sacré) qui accompagnent le mort dans sa tombe, comme à Igbo-Ukwu au Nigeria, ou certains objets funéraires trouvés fortuitement et réutilisés en surface, comme chez les Kissi en Guinée, ceux de la culture nok ou de celle d'Owo au Nigeria.

En Afrique, les esprits sont partout présents. Un homme devient souvent plus important après sa mort que pendant sa vie. Les signes de surface fonctionnent par ensembles et sous-ensembles, dans un rapport étroit entre le rôle qu'ils jouent et celui de leurs manipulateurs ; il existe des objets collectifs (souvent les masques), semi-collectifs (de nouveau les masques et une petite partie de la statuaire) et ceux -particulièrement des statuettes- réservés aux sages, mémoire vivante de la communauté. Ceux-ci réactualisent continuellement les objets dans les relations qu'ils entretiennent avec le monde extérieur (événements historiques, contacts avec l'islam, le christianisme, migrations, guerres, alliances) et le monde intérieur (esprits, mort, rêves). Autour

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Jackson Pollock

Photographer Hans Namuth extensively documented Pollock's unique painting techniques.
Birth name     Paul Jackson Pollock
Born     January 28, 1912(1912-01-28)
Cody, Wyoming
Died     August 11, 1956 (aged 44)
Springs, New York
Nationality     American
Field     Painter
Training     Art Students League of New York
Movement     Abstract expressionism
Patrons     Peggy Guggenheim

Paul Jackson Pollock (January 28, 1912 – August 11, 1956) was an influential American painter and a major figure in the abstract expressionist movement. In October 1945, he married the artist Lee Krasner.  During his lifetime, Pollock enjoyed considerable fame and notoriety. He was regarded as a mostly reclusive artist, but had a volatile personality and struggled with alcoholism all of his life. He died at the age of 44 in an alcohol-related, single-car crash. In December 1956, he was given a memorial
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Image Tristan Tzara
Tristan Tzara

Born     April 4 or April 16, 1896
Moineşti, Kingdom of Romania
Died     December 25, 1963 (aged 67)
Paris, France
Pen name     S. Samyro, Tristan, Tristan Ruia, Tristan Ţara, Tr. Tzara
Occupation     poet, essayist, journalist, playwright, performance artist, composer, film director, politician, diplomat
Nationality     Romanian, French
Writing period     1912–1963

            Guillaume Apollinaire, Henri Barzun, Fernand Divoire, Alfred Jarry, Jules Laforgue, Comte de Lautréamont, Maurice Maeterlinck, Adrian Maniu, Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, Ion Minulescu, Christian Morgenstern, Francis Picabia, Arthur Rimbaud, Urmuz, François Villon, Walt Whitman

Influenced

            Louis Aragon, Marcel Avramescu, Samuel Beckett, André Breton, William S. Burroughs, Andrei Codrescu, Jacques G.
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Image André Breton
André Breton

André Breton (February 19, 1896 – September 28, 1966) was a French writer, poet, and surrealist theorist, and is best known as the principal founder of Surrealism. His writings include the Surrealist Manifesto of 1924, in which he defined surrealism as "pure psychic automatism".

Biography

Born to a family of modest means in Tinchebray (Orne) in Normandy, he studied medicine and psychiatry. During World War I he worked in a neurological ward in Nantes, where he met the spiritual son of Alfred Jarry, Jacques Vaché, whose anti-social attitude and disdain for established artistic tradition influenced Breton considerably. Vaché committed suicide at age 24 and his war-time letters to Breton and others were published in a volume entitled Lettres de guerre (1919), for which Breton wrote four introductory essays.

From Dada to Surrealism

In 1919 Breton founded the review Littérature with Louis Aragon and Philippe Soupault. He also connected with Dadaist Tristan Tzara. In 1924 he was instrumental to the founding of the Bureau of Surrealist Research.

In The Magnetic Fields (Les Champs Magnétiques), a collaboration with Soupault, he put the principle of automatic writing into practice. He published the Surrealist Manifesto in 1924, and was editor of La
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Art

Art

Art is the process or product of deliberately arranging elements in a way that appeals to the senses or emotions. It encompasses a diverse range of human activities, creations, and modes of expression, including music and literature. The meaning of art is explored in a branch of philosophy known as aesthetics.

The definition and evaluation of art has become especially problematic since the early 20th century. Richard Wollheim distinguishes three approaches: the Realist, whereby aesthetic quality is an absolute value independent of any human view; the Objectivist, whereby it is also an absolute value, but is dependent on general human experience; and the Relativist position, whereby it is not an absolute value, but depends on, and varies with, the human experience of different humans. An object may be characterized by the intentions, or lack thereof, of its creator, regardless of its apparent purpose. A cup, which ostensibly can be used as a container, may be considered art if intended solely as an ornament, while a painting may be deemed craft if mass-produced.

Traditionally, the term art was used to refer to any skill or mastery. This conception changed during the Romantic period, when art came to be seen as "a special faculty of the human mind to be classified with religion and science". Generally, art is made with the intention of stimulating thoughts and emotions.

The nature of art has been described by Richard Wollheim as "one of the most elusive of the traditional problems of human culture". It has been defined
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On doit à Alexandre Brongniart, directeur de la manufacture de Sèvres de 1800 à 1847, la théorie de la céramique, qu'il a publiée en 1841-1844 dans son Traité des Arts céramiques, ou des Poteries, considérées dans leur Histoire, leur Pratique et leur Théorie. Le premier, il a classé les céramiques en fonction de la porosité / imperméabilité de leur pâte.


Céramique (keramos, argile en grec). Terme générique ayant trait à l'ensemble des objets fabriqués en terre et ayant subi, au cours d'une cuisson à température plus ou moins élevée, une transformation physico-chimique irréversible leur conférant une dureté caractéristique.
Pâtes ouvertes (=poreuses) :   
 -   Terre cuite ou poterie.   

-    Terre cuite à glaçure plombifère.
-    Faïence stannifère.
-    Faïence fine.
-    Pâte siliceuse.
Pâtes fermées (=imperméables) :
-    Grès.

-    Porcelaine
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Le pigment est une substance colorée naturelle ou artificielle. Dans la nature cela peut-être le constituant d'un minéral ou bien une substance organique, animale ou végétale, présente dans les cellules d'un organisme vivant et produisant la couleur.En art ou en industrie les pigments sont des poudres, généralement broyées très finement avant d'être mises en suspension dans un liant (ou médium), liquide, plus ou moins fluide, ou visqueux, pour obtenir les peintures, les enduits, ou les encres. Ils sont généralement insolubles dans le milieu se fixant à la surface du support sur lequel on l'applique, contrairement aux teintures qui pénètrent dans les fibres.

Histoire

Les colorants étaient connus et utilisés depuis la plus haute Antiquité. Les Sumériens, Grecs, Romains, Égyptiens, Mayas, etc. les utilisaient abondamment, notamment comme produits cosmétiques.
Cependant, ces colorants, malgré leur très grande efficacité, ne sont plus utilisés car ils contenaient des sels métalliques hautement toxiques comme des arséniates, du carbonate de cuivre ou vert-de-gris, de la céruse sans oublier l'antimoine, le mercure, le plomb, etc.

Botanique

Substance organique produisant la couleur constitutive des éléments de la plante :
    * feuilles : chlorophylle (E140), anthocyanes (E163) (ou lipochromes) rouges, bleus ou violets
    * tronc :
    * racines : carotène (caroténoïdes E160)
Les principaux pigments naturels (colorants) extraits des plantes comprennent :
    * l'indigo tiré de l'indigotier,
    * le
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(De l’anglais, signifiant « intégral »)

Principe pictural et procédé de composition où les éléments picturaux sont répartis également sur toute la surface, paraissant même pouvoir s’étendre au-delà du tableau. La perception est ainsi décentrée, l’œil n’étant plus dirigé dans une direction définie. Ce terme a servi à caractériser la démarche de Jackson Pollock au cours des années 1940.

african art / art africain / primitive art / art primitif / arts premiers / art gallery / art tribal / tribal art / l'oeil et la main / galerie d'art premier / Paris / masques africains / mask /Agalom / Armand Auxiètre / www.african-paris.com / www.agalom.com

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