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GALERIE ART PREMIER AFRICAIN GALERIE ART PRIMITIF AFRICAIN AFRICAN ART GALLERY

Art Gallery the Eye and the Hand
Result of the research Result of the research : 'family'

MOSSI

                 

 

 

 





  Poupées
  Masques

Poupée biga
Poupée biga
€ 2,600.00
Ciwara mask, Bambara, Mali
Ciwara mask, Bambara, Mali
€ 25,000.00
Ciwara mask, Bambara, Mali
Ciwara mask, Bambara, Mali
€ 55,000.00

Socleurs/restaurateurs:

 

Ebenisterie DAGORN

FOURNISSEUR DU MOBILIER NATIONAL, DIPLÔMÉ DE L'ÉCOLE BOULLE

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Treasures marks the National Museum of African Art's 25th anniversary as a Smithsonian museum. The first in a new exhibition series, Treasuresis an old-fashioned show about African art, reminiscent of the exhibitions that represented avant-garde opinions of the early 20th century. In 1926, Paul Guillaume, Parisian connoisseur and collector, cautioned readers to defer learning about the history and meaning of African art until they had studied African art purely as an art form, because to do otherwise "tends to obscure one's vision of the objects as sculpture."

I chose the familiar--traditional sculpture--to reveal aesthetic variances, to see African art as form, not function. Treasures, therefore, is about visual exploration and aesthetic discovery. Our understanding of African art is prescribed by what we see, and often, what we see is based on works displayed in museums. So, "Treasures" is just that--a sampling that gives us a peek into the realm of African art.

Westerners and Africans alike revere well-made form. Each admires skillful technique and execution, exquisitely rendered forms, pattern, balance, symmetry, surface treatments and a sense of completeness. African artists, however, strive to portray more than that. As metaphor or symbol, their artworks embody the world of ideas and beliefs--confirming their notions about themselves, life and death, the universe and the spiritual realm. Yet, despite our cultural presumptions that separate art from life, often separating aesthetics from meaning, and our ignorance of or indifference to what it means and how it is used, African art astonishes.

An eclectic display of sculptures from East, West, Central, and southern Africa created between the 15th

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Image Motherhoods

MOTHERHOODS

 

ART GALLERY L'OEIL ET LA MAIN

41 RUE DE VERNEUIL 75007 PARIS

 EXHIBITION FROM THE 4TH OF JUNE TO THE 30TH OF SEPTEMBER 2009

 WWW.AFRICAN-PARIS.COM


The image of the mother carrying her child is very present in Westerner imaginary, reflecting the importance of the woman not only in her wife role, but also as a mother. In addition to their social and economic importance, the African mothers also have a quasi-magic capacity. The birth is indeed regarded as a godsend, because this is the child who later will take care of his/her parents, become old, and will work for them as they worked for him. Moreover, in many cultures, the woman is often a priestess specialist in the rites and a person in charge of the worship, and many spirits are female ones. This fact partly explains the importance of the female image in the African sculpture. Although a child is raised by the members of the family extended, the link between him/her and his/her mother remains very strong, especially at the period of early childhood, the carved works presented at the time of this exhibition are a proof of that fact. Motherhood represents the female principle par excellence. But are african motherhoods statues of mother with child or statues of mother and child? Which are the relationships between the mother and the child in a sculpture of motherhood?

Very often mother and child do not set up a
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A little history ...

In 1981, during the opening of the gallery Amber, that arises the idea of gathering around the opening five to six colleagues antique arts primary and thus offer the public the first "Open House on non-European art "at the Sablon.

The project is successful, the key to success ... The idea was encrusted to the point of other galleries, Belgian and foreign.

In 1988, a pamphlet modest rally materializes this antique constantly growing, and three years later, the first edition of a catalog reflects the success of this consortium of antique dealers mobilized to the same object: to promote the exceptional richness of the arts which they are the first ambassadors.

Since 1996, antique Brussels even invited into their local foreign colleagues. Today, galleries French, Italian, Spanish, English, Dutch and American joined the event, giving an international dimension.

The Brussels Non European Art Fair has become one of the most important manifestations of non-European art, covering sectors as diverse as African art, Oceanic art, Indonesian art, pre-Columbian art or the Asian art and the art of Australian Aborigines.

Sculptures, masks, fetishes, guns, jewelry, coins, textiles, traditional objects carried by people for their use, wood, metal, gold, silver, bronze, ivory and terra cotta, the exhibits are ritual or domestic alliance shape and ornament.

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Jacques Chirac

22nd President of the French Republic
5th President of the Fifth Republic
Co-Prince of Andorra
In office
17 May 1995 – 16 May 2007
Prime Minister     Alain Juppé
Lionel Jospin
Jean-Pierre Raffarin
Dominique de Villepin
Preceded by     François Mitterrand
Succeeded by     Nicolas Sarkozy
Mayor of Paris
In office
20 March 1977 – 16 May 1995
Preceded by     Office Created
Succeeded by     Jean Tiberi
159th Prime Minister of France
10th Prime Minister of Fifth Republic
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Image Georges-Henri Rivière

 

PARIS - JOSEPHINE BAKER - GEORGES-HENRI RIVIERE Joséphine Baker (1906-1975), artiste de music-hall et Georges-Henri Rivière (1897-1985), ethnographe français, au musée ethnographique du Trocadéro. Paris, juin 1933. LIP-6259-052

PARIS - JOSEPHINE BAKER - GEORGES-HENRI RIVIERE

Joséphine Baker (1906-1975), artiste de music-hall et Georges-Henri Rivière (1897-1985), ethnographe français, au musée ethnographique du Trocadéro. Paris, juin 1933. LIP-6259-052

Portrait de Thérèse Rivière © musée du quai Branly, photo Jacques Faublée
Portrait de Thérèse Rivière © musée du quai Branly, photo Jacques Faublée
Soeur de Georges-Henri

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Africa

Africa is the world's second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. At about 30.2 million km² (11.7 million sq mi) including adjacent islands, it covers 6% of the Earth's total surface area and 20.4% of the total land area. With a billion people (as of 2009, see table) in 61 territories, it accounts for about 14.8% of the World's human population. The continent is surrounded by the Mediterranean Sea to the north, the Suez Canal and the Red Sea to the northeast, the Indian Ocean to the southeast, and the Atlantic Ocean to the west. Not counting the disputed territory of Western Sahara, there are 53 countries, including Madagascar and various island groups, associated with the continent.

Africa, particularly central eastern Africa, is widely regarded within the scientific community to be the origin of humans and the Hominidae tree (great apes), as evidenced by the discovery of the earliest hominids and their ancestors, as well as later ones that have been dated to around seven million years ago – including Sahelanthropus tchadensis, Australopithecus africanus, A. afarensis, Homo erectus, H. habilis and H. ergaster – with the earliest Homo sapiens (human) found in Ethiopia being dated to ca. 200,000 years ago.

Africa straddles the equator and encompasses numerous climate areas; it is the only continent to stretch from the northern temperate to southern temperate zones.

Etymology

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African traditional religion

African traditional religions, also referred to as African indigenous religions or African tribal religions, is a term referring to a variety of religions indigenous to the continent of Africa. Like tribal religions from other parts of the world, African religious traditions are defined largely along community lines.

Traditional African religions involve teachings, practices, and rituals that lend structure to indigenous African societies. These traditional African religions also play a large part in the cultural understanding and awareness of the people of their communities.


African Traditional Religion and Language

Most traditional African religions have, for most of their existence, been orally/spiritually (rather than scripturally) transmitted. Thus, linguistic experts such as Christopher Ehret and Placide Tempels have applied their knowledge of languages towards reconstructing the original core beliefs of the followers of these traditions. The four linguistic phylums spoken in Africa are: Afro-Asiatic, Nilo-Saharan, Niger-Congo, and Khoi-San.

Afro-Asiatic Spirituality

According to linguist Christopher Ehret, traditional religion among Afro-Asiatic-speaking (Afrasan) peoples was originally henotheistic in nature. In this sense, each clan gave
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Mali Empire

The Mali Empire or Manding Empire or Manden Kurufa was a West African civilization of the Mandinka from c. 1230 to c. 1600. The empire was founded by Sundiata Keita and became renowned for the wealth of its rulers, especially Mansa Musa I. The Mali Empire had many profound cultural influences on West Africa allowing the spread of its language, laws and customs along the Niger River. The Mali empire extended over an area larger than western Europe and consisted of numerous vassal kingdoms and provinces.

Manden

1235-1600's. The Mali Empire grew out of an area referred to by its contemporary inhabitants as Manden. Manden, named for its inhabitants the Mandinka (initially Manden’ka with “ka” meaning people of), comprised most of present-day northern Guinea and southern Mali. The empire was originally established as a federation of Mandinka tribes called the Manden Kurufa (literally Manden Federation), but it later became an empire ruling millions of people from nearly every ethnic group in West Africa.

Etymology

The naming origins of the Mali Empire are complex and still debated in scholarly circles around the world. While the meaning of “Mali” is still contested, the process of how it entered the regional lexicon is not. As mentioned earlier, the Mandinka of the Middle Ages referred to their ethnic homeland as “Manden”.
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Image Claude Levi-Strauss
Claude Lévi-Strauss


20th-century philosophy
Full name     Claude Lévi-Strauss
Born     28 November 1908 (1908-11-28) (age 100)
Brussels, Belgium
School/tradition     Structuralism

Claude Lévi-Strauss; born 28 November 1908) is a French anthropologist.

Biography

Claude Lévi-Strauss, born in Brussels, grew up in Paris, living in a street of the 16th arrondissement named after the artist Nicolas Poussin, whose work he later admired and wrote about. Lévi-Strauss's father was also a painter, and Claude was born in Brussels because his father had taken a contract to paint there.

At the Sorbonne in Paris, Lévi-Strauss studied law and philosophy. After an epiphany resulting from a late night conversation strolling around the grounds of True's Yard, King's Lynn with renowned cryptozoologist Lewis Daly,he did not pursue his study of law but agrégated in philosophy in 1931. In 1935, after a few years of secondary-school teaching, he took up a last-minute offer to be part of a French cultural mission to Brazil in which he
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Image Paul Klee
Paul Klee

Born     18 December 1879
Münchenbuchsee bei Bern, Switzerland
Died     29 June 1940 (aged 60)
Muralto, Switzerland
Nationality     German/Swiss
Training     Academy of Fine Arts, Munich
Works     more than 10,000 paintings, drawings, and etchings, including The Twittering Machine (1922), Fish Magic (1925), Viaducts Break Ranks (1937).

Paul Klee (18 December 1879 – 29 June 1940) was a Swiss painter of German nationality. His highly individual style was influenced by movements in art that included expressionism, cubism, and surrealism. He was, as well, a student of orientalism. Klee was a natural draftsman who experimented with and eventually mastered color theory, and wrote extensively about it. His works reflect his dry humor and his sometimes child-like perspective, his personal moods and beliefs, and his musicality. He and his friend, the Russian painter Wassily Kandinsky, both taught at the German Bauhaus school of art and architecture.

Early life and training
“     First of all, the art of living; then as my
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FORCE ET MESURE

Elaborer une esthétique de l'Afrique noire apparaît comme une entreprise hasardeuse à bien des égards. Est-il légitime d'isoler ces objets, qu'aujourd'hui nous qualifions d'œuvres d'art, du cadre général de leurs relations et de leurs contraintes culturelles ? Peut-on les soumettre à un critère qui n'a jamais existé dans la pensée de leurs créateurs ? Et peut-on, enfin, voir dans cet art - si l'on s' en tient à ce terme - un phénomène uniforme, malgré la grande variété de styles tant régionaux que locaux que nous offre cet énorme continent, à la suite de longues évolutions historiques souvent mal connues ? Enfin, n'oublions pas que cette approche exclut de vastes régions, notamment l' Afrique blanche, c' est à dire la zone méditerranéenne avec son histoire millénaire ; l'Afrique orientale et méridionale dont les peuples de pasteurs ont donné naissance à des cultures pratiquement sans images ; et enfin ces sociétés de chasseurs, qui, encore à notre époque, n'ont pas dépassé le stade d'évolution de la préhistoire et dont les peintures rupestres constituent le principal témoignage d'une production artistique qui apparaît en divers points du continent. De même, il nous faut exclure de notre contribution à une esthétique de l'art d'Afrique noire les anciennes sociétés féodales, notamment le Bénin. Notre réflexion se borne donc aux vastes régions paysannes, véritable berceau de la sculpture sur bois.

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Jacques Kerchache


Vie des objets de surface

Les objets rituels, masques, statues, mobilier, utilisés en surf ace, jouent dans la société africaine traditionnelle, m rôle bien plus important que les objets funéraires, destinés à'être enterrés. Il faut leur adjoindre une petite quantité de pièces au double emploi (parures, mobilier sacré) qui accompagnent le mort dans sa tombe, comme à Igbo-Ukwu au Nigeria, ou certains objets funéraires trouvés fortuitement et réutilisés en surface, comme chez les Kissi en Guinée, ceux de la culture nok ou de celle d'Owo au Nigeria.

En Afrique, les esprits sont partout présents. Un homme devient souvent plus important après sa mort que pendant sa vie. Les signes de surface fonctionnent par ensembles et sous-ensembles, dans un rapport étroit entre le rôle qu'ils jouent et celui de leurs manipulateurs ; il existe des objets collectifs (souvent les masques), semi-collectifs (de nouveau les masques et une petite partie de la statuaire) et ceux -particulièrement des statuettes- réservés aux sages, mémoire vivante de la communauté. Ceux-ci réactualisent continuellement les objets dans les relations qu'ils entretiennent avec le monde extérieur (événements historiques, contacts avec l'islam, le christianisme, migrations, guerres, alliances) et le monde intérieur (esprits, mort, rêves). Autour

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André Malraux

André Malraux (3 November 1901 – 23 November 1976) was a French author, adventurer and statesman, and a dominant figure in French politics and culture.

Biography

Malraux was born in Paris in 1901. His parents separated in 1905 and eventually divorced. He was raised by his mother and maternal grandmother, Berthe and Adrienne Lamy. His father, a stockbroker, committed suicide in 1930. Andre had Tourette's Syndrome during his childhood, resulting in motor and vocal tics. This may have contributed to his animated and memorable oratory style later in life.

At the age of 21, Malraux left for Cambodia with his new wife Clara Goldschmidt. In Cambodia, he undertook an exploratory expedition into the Cambodian jungle. On his return he was arrested by French colonial authorities for removing bas-reliefs from one of the temples he discovered. Banteay Srei. The French government itself had removed large numbers of sculptures and artifacts from already discovered sites such as Angkor Wat around this time. Malraux later incorporated the episode into his second novel La Voie Royale.

Malraux became highly critical of the French colonial authorities in Indochina, and in 1925 helped to organize the Young Annam League and founded a newspaper Indochina in Chains.

On his return to France, he published
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Collection Armand Auxietre
Art primitif, Art premier, Art africain, African Art Gallery, Tribal Art Gallery
41 rue de Verneuil 75007 PARIS
Tél. Fax. : +33 (0)6 61 12 97 26
 
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